We ensure that children who struggle in learning to read and write gain the skills for a literate and productive future

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 2016 Featured Speakers  


CLASSROOM LITERACY SESSIONS OPEN TO ALL ATTENDEES

Project-Based Informational Text Author Studies

Nell Duke
Professor of literacy, language, and culture, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Author studies are a powerful tool for developing reading and writing, but they are too often reserved for fictional narrative authors. Duke identifies study-worthy informational text authors and shows you how to conduct author study using a project-based approach.
 

Nell Duke

What "Developing Literate Minds' Means in the Classroom

Peter Johnston
Author and professor emeritus, State University of New York at Albany, Albany ,NY

Explore the relationship between classroom practices and students’ developing literate minds, including their control of attention, self-regulation,social imagination, as well as more conventional aspects of literate development such as comprehension. Developing literate minds requires understanding the relationships among classroom talk, the individual and the collaborative mind, and the nature of literacy.
 

Peter Johnston

After Well-Intended Instruction Fails, What's Next?

Stuart McNaughton
Author and professor of education, University of Auckland, New Zealand

Despite our best intentions, the instruction we provide sometimes can have unintended and problematic consequences. There are two consequences of knowing this. One is that in order to use instructional tools effectively teachers need to know a lot about them and to be experts who are adaptive in their use. A second is that sharing our professional knowledge about how to reduce the “risks” and to maintain our effectiveness is crucial. Identify examples and develop explanations which help respond to both of these consequences.
 

Stuart McNaughton

TICKETED SESSIONS OPEN TO READING RECOVERY-TRAINED PROFESSIONALS ONLY

Adjusting the Visual Working System: What Does this Mean as Children Learn to Read?

Sue Duncan
Reading Recovery trainer, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA

“Adjusting the visual working system” is what Clay says needs to happen as children become readers and writers. Learning to look at print and word work are explored as we think about some of the adjustments that need to be made to become a competent reader. Video clips included to enable participants to discuss, analyze and reflect.

Sue Duncan

The Process of Visual Information: Looking, Sounding, Integrating

Mary Fried
Reading Recovery trainer, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH

Clay (2005, p. 148) states ‘Print information must pass through the visual sense for reading to occur and children have to learn what visual information in print is usable and how to use it.’ These wise words from Clay are explored in depth because the processing of visual information and its integration with other sources of information is critical for the student’s accelerated learning.

Mary Fried

Contingent Teaching and the Scale of Help

Mary Lose
Reading Recovery trainer, Oakland University, Rochester, MI

Explore the ways in which Reading Recovery teachers respond contingently to children’s emerging competencies in reading and writing, employing a scale of help in support of effective, self-regulated, and self-extending literacy processing systems that change over time. Video recordings and transcripts of child-teacher interactions are used as illustrations.
 

Mary Lose
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